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Region 5: AK, CA, HI, NV, OR, WA and U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States
Updated: 3 days 28 min ago

NNLM Region 5 Announces Professional Development Awards!

Mon, 2021-11-22 21:35

NNLM Region 5 is pleased to announce new Professional Development Awards for up to $1,500/ each.  Applications for these awards can be submitted until February 16, 2022 while funds are still available.

Plan now to submit your award application to cover costs to attend virtual or in-person classes, conferences or workshops in the United States.  The award can also be used to arrange for an expert speaker to give a talk, workshop, class or lecture for participants in your organization or community. Events must be scheduled to occur between now and April 30, 2022.

Meetings, workshops, classes or talks should focus on health information; health literacy; health equity; diversity, equity and inclusion; outreach and engagement; citizen science; data science; public health; emergency preparedness; evidence-based medicine, and organizational effectiveness.

To see the full funding announcement and download the Professional Development Award Application, visit: https://nnlm.gov/funding/rfa/professional-development-award-1

 

 

 

The post NNLM Region 5 Announces Professional Development Awards! first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: Urban Institute’s “Do No Harm Guide”

Mon, 2021-11-22 10:02

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of attending a Public Library Association (PLA) webinar on data and came across a gem of a resource from the Urban Institute.  The Urban Institute has been around for over 50 years providing facts and knowledge in an accessible way to communities surrounding social and economic issues. This much needed resource on data ethics was published June 2021 from the Urban Institute and is authored by Alice Feng and Jonathan Schwabish and it is called the “Do No Harm Guide – Applying Equity Awareness in Data Visualization”.

This resource is AMAZING. It is a guide on how to develop data analytics that are accessible, diverse, inclusive, and equitable. It looks at data behind the point on a graph to really emphasize the person and lived experience behind each data point. As well, the “Do No Harm Guide …” teaches people how to create data visualizations with an equity lens so that communities are not harmed by the data and visualizations. The theme that is highlighted throughout the guide is the concept of reciprocity – that researchers need to exercise reciprocity when collecting data from communities especially marginalized ones. The question of how can communities benefit from the data collected and the research done is a central question asked and honored throughout this guide; so, rather than exploiting communities for their data, the “Do No Harm Guide…” encourages researchers to empower the communities that they work with by looking at ways the data could improve the lives of the people who make up the respective researched communities.

The most useful and helpful part of this guide is their reference section of ALL the material that they researched to write this great guide.  Alice and Jonathan share the books and websites that inspired and guided their own work in data analytics. If you are short on time, have a look at their one-page DEI data visualization checklist or their one-page DEI data visualization guide at the end of their report. Happy reading!!!

The post DataFlash: Urban Institute’s “Do No Harm Guide” first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

There’s Still Time to Apply for the Collection Equity Award! We’ve extended the LOI deadline

Fri, 2021-11-19 16:07
Collection Equity Award

NNLM Region 5 is pleased to announce that we have extended the deadline to submit a Letter of Intent (LOI) for the second round of funding of our popular Collection Equity Award to December 1, 2021. Applications are due December 10, 2021. Read on for all you need to know to apply:

Background/Purpose

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Region 5 under cooperative agreement with the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), announces the availability of funding through its Collection Equity Awards to fund collection development that amplifies diverse voices writing on health/medical topics or that include a health or medical issue as an integral narrative theme. Such collection development efforts are important to ensure equitable access to health information and promote health literacy and support programmatic outreach in under-resourced communities.

The Awards are designed to help build collections that are reflective of voices of the communities served which may be revealed through different genres such as graphic medicine, fiction, nonfiction, memoirs, Young Adult, manuscripts (published and unpublished), oral histories and film. Expanding diverse voices in libraries (all types), public health agencies, academic programs, or community organizations ensures collection equity and supports health literacy by illuminating health issues either common, or conversely, unique to underserved populations in the region.

Specifically, the Collection Equity Award seeks to address one or more of the following aims from the NNLM Region 5 cooperative agreement and supports NLM’s mission to provide U.S. researchers, health professionals, public health workforce, educators, and the public with equal access to biomedical and health information resources and data.

  • Advance health equity through national and regional partnerships and initiatives to ensure a variety of members and the public will have equal access to biomedical, health, and public health information and data.
  • Administer funding awards to support a highly trained workforce for biomedical and health information resources and data, improve health literacy, and increase health equity through information.
Eligibility

Applicants must be from institutions that are members of NNLM Region 5. Membership is free and open to institutions interested in improving equitable access to health information. To verify your membership, find out your NNLM ID or to apply for membership, contact Outreach and Access Coordinator Emily Hamstra via email: ehamstra@uw.edu.

Funds from this award must be used for purchase of materials and resources from any genre that amplify diverse voices writing on health/medical topics or that include a health or medical issue as an integral narrative theme.

Funding

Funding Period: December 17, 2021 – April 30, 2022

Amount:  $1,500

Number of Awards Available: Minimum of 6

Application

Step 1: Send an email stating your intent to apply by 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time on December 1, 2021 to nnlm@uw.edu. Include the name of your library/organization and your intent to apply for the Collection Equity Award.

Step 2: Download this Application Form and submit the completed Application Form to nnlm@uw.edu by the Application Deadline: 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time, December 10, 2021

Note: 

  • Applications submitted by 5:00pm Pacific Time, December 10, 2021, will receive first consideration.
  • The NNLM Region 5 staff will acknowledge your application when received, and notification of awards will be given by December 17, 2021.

Budget Guidelines:

  • Award is $1,500. A lump sum payment will be issued upon submission of a completed invoice. The invoice template will be provided by Region 5 staff.
Evaluation of Applications

Applications will be reviewed by: NNLM Region 5 staff.

Reviewers will score applications based on the following categories and criteria.

  1. SIGNIFICANCE (60 points): The proposal:
    1. clearly defines the target populations it is meant to serve; and
    2. provides evidence of need.
  2. PROJECT PLAN (20 points): The project plan:
    1. demonstrates potential to increase access to biomedical and health information for defined target populations; and
    2. describes an effective publicity/promotion strategy.
  3. EVALUATION (20 points): The evaluation plan is clear and uses sound methodology.

 

REPORTING: The applicant agrees to the reporting requirement. This is an inclusion/exclusion criterion. Applicants lacking this element will be disqualified.

Additional Information

Reporting: 

A final report is required no later than May 27, 2022, which consists of a bibliography of the resources purchased. The citation format will be provided to awardees.

NIH Acknowledgement:

Any resource developed with project funds must include an acknowledgment of NIH grant support and a disclaimer stating the following:

“Developed resources reported in this [publications, press releases, internet sites] are supported by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH) under cooperative agreement number UG4LM013725. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.”

Need additional information or help?

Michele Spatz, Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, NNLM Region 5, nnlm@uw.edu

Telephone: 206-543-8262

 

The post There’s Still Time to Apply for the Collection Equity Award! We’ve extended the LOI deadline first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

MEDLINE Now Playing on a Platform Near You: Maximizing Your MEDLINE Experience in PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid

Wed, 2021-11-17 17:51

The Pacific Northwest Chapter/ Medical Library Association (PNCMLA) hosted a virtual conference November 4-5, 2021. At the conference, I presented with Andrew Hamilton (Oregon Health Sciences University) and Diana Louden (University of Washington) on searching MEDLINE in PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid. The presentation included and overview of MEDLINE and tips on searching in each platform. This post provides resources shared and discussed in the presentation.

MEDLINE is an index of 28 million journal articles from 5,200 journals in biomedicine. The index is maintained by the National Library of Medicine (NLM). A distinctive feature of MEDLINE is that the records are indexed with NLM Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). MEDLINE can be searched through multiple platforms, including PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid. MEDLINE in PubMed is free to search and use, while EBSCO and Ovid require a subscription.

Consider using MEDLINE on different platforms like seeing the same movie in a different theater. You might prefer one theater; your friend might prefer another. Maybe you like the snack options in your favorite theater, maybe you like the seats, maybe you like the price. Similarly, many people have preferences about what platform they use for MEDLINE searching. PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid all have different features and strengths for searching MEDLINE.

Andrew created the cheat sheet below to compare key differences in search strategies for MEDLINE in PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid.

————————————————————————————————————–

Searching Medline in PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid Phrase Searching Commands PubMed
  • Use of quotation marks (“used tires”) will search the PubMed Phrase index.
  • If the term is not included in the phrase index, PubMed will revert to using Automatic Term Mapping to process the words in the quoted phrase
  • Allows searches for embedded stop words or Boolean operators (e.g. “hit or miss”)
EBSCO
  • Use of quotation marks (“used tires”) will cause EBSCO to look for words in the exact order
  • Allows searches for embedded stop words or Boolean operators (e.g. “hit or miss”)
Ovid
  • Use of quotation marks (“used tires”) will cause Ovid to look for words in the exact order
  • Allows searches for embedded stop words or Boolean operators (e.g. “hit or miss”)
  • FREQUENCY SEARCH COMMAND SYNTAX: x.ab./FREQ=n (diabet*.tw./FREQ=5 finds any record with 5 or more instances of words beginning with diabet- in the textword field)
Adjacency Searching Commands PubMed 
  • No adjacency search function available
EBSCO
  • N# for bidirectional adjacency
  • W# for unidirectional adjacency
Ovid
  • ADJ# for bidirectional adjacency
  • ADJ is a one word unidirectional adjacency command
  • No multiword unidirectional adjacency
Truncation Searching Commands PubMed
  • Uses asterisk (*) for unlimited truncation.
  • Use of * turns off automatic term mapping for that term
  • Truncated terms must contain at least four characters
  • No character limited truncation searching
EBSCO
  • Uses asterisk (*) for unlimited truncation.
  • The hash sign (#) matches one optional character.
  • The question mark (?) matches exactly one character.
  • No minimum character limit for * truncation
  • No character limited truncation searching
Ovid
  • Uses asterisk (*), dollar sign ($), or colon (:) for unlimited truncation.
  • The question mark (?) matches one optional character.
  • The hash sign (#) matches exactly one character.
  • No minimum character limit for */$/: truncation
  • Use of *# = the max number of characters allowed.  (e.g. diet*3 will find diets, dieting, dietary, but not diethylene or diethylamino, etc.)
MeSH Explosion Commands PubMed
  • Automatic explosion.  Use [mh:noexp] to turn off explode feature
EBSCO
  • No automatic explosion. Use exp MeSH Term to enable explosion
Ovid
  • No automatic explosion. Use exp MeSH Term to enable explosion

——————————————————————————————————————-

A copy of the cheat sheet is available as a chart to download (PDF). Slides from the presentation and the presentation recording are available on request (contact ehamstra@uw.edu).

 

The National Library of Medicine and the Network of the National Library of Medicine provide additional resources on MEDLINE:

The post MEDLINE Now Playing on a Platform Near You: Maximizing Your MEDLINE Experience in PubMed, EBSCO, and Ovid first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

Let’s Talk! Lifelong Learning & NNLM

Mon, 2021-11-08 12:29

Please join us for our NNLM Region 5 Listens Session on Tuesday, November 16, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. PST | 2:00 p.m. – 3:00pm AKST | 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. HST | Noon – 1:00 p.m. SST (American Samoa) | November 17, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. ChST (Guam).

Our November discussion topic is – Lifelong Learning: NNLM Education Programs.

Registration is required to join the NNLM Region 5 Listens Session. Registration is free. Register here!

Please note: you must have a free NNLM User Account to Register for the Listens Session. Need help creating your account? Click here for easy-to-follow instructions.

The post Let’s Talk! Lifelong Learning & NNLM first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

Announcing NNLM Region 5 Professional Development Awards

Fri, 2021-11-05 16:15

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) Region 5, under cooperative agreement with the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), announces the availability of funding through Professional Development Awards to increase knowledge, skills and competencies of NNLM network members on areas related to NLM priorities.

With these awards, NNLM Region 5 commits to prioritizing support for underrepresented populations through their meaningful engagement in professional development activities.

These awards support:

  • individual class, conference or workshop attendance
  • the costs associated with arranging for an expert speaker to give a talk, workshop, class or lecture; and
  • educational activities that relate to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and aim to prepare professionals to better serve underserved, minority and underrepresented communities.

A minimum of 8 awards of up to $1,500 each will be funded.

Awards will be available on an ongoing basis until funds are expended. To see the full funding announcement and the Professional Development Award Application, click here.

For questions or additional information contact: Cathy Burroughs, Executive Director, Email: nnlm@uw.edu, Telephone: (206) 543-9261.

The post Announcing NNLM Region 5 Professional Development Awards first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

Consumer Health Minute: Creating an NNLM User Account

Thu, 2021-11-04 07:51

One of the great benefits the Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) offers, is free professional development including consumer health classes.

Classes come in a variety of formats including:

  • On-demand online
  • Scheduled asynchronous online
  • Live webinars
  • Live webinar series with guest speakers
  • Special events

You will be prompted to create an NNLM User Account when registering for classes. This is not the same as being an organizational member. Creating a User Account will make registering for future classes and webinars easier but it also allows you to keep track of the classes you registered for.

Below are steps to creating a user account:

1.) Go to the NNLM website at https://nnlm.gov/

2.) In the upper right corner, click on Create an NNLM User Account (red box highlights this in image below)

NNLM website with red box highlighting where to create a user account

An NNLM User Account form will appear.

3.) Fill in the required * sections of the form as well as optional sections you choose.

NNLM new User Account form

4.) Click on SUBMIT button.

NNLM new User Account form, Submit button

 

If you created a User Account before May 1, 2021, you may need to reset your password.

1.) Click on Reset Your Password

Resetting Password for NNLM User Account

2.) You should receive an email message asking you to click on a link to create a new password.

3.) Follow the steps provided to create a new password.

For additional assistance, please email Carolyn Martin at martinc4@uw.edu

The post Consumer Health Minute: Creating an NNLM User Account first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

All I know About Partnerships

Mon, 2021-11-01 18:08

We hosted an NNLM Region 5 Listens Session with the theme of Partnerships as our discussion topic and to be honest, it didn’t go so well. Our Region 5 staff came to listen, assuming participants would bring experience and lessons learned to the discussion. Unfortunately, our participants actually came to learn the basics because many of them haven’t partnered before. We ended the session early and I can’t imagine anyone was pleased. So, while I can’t do a rewind, I can share what I know about partnerships within the context of the questions we asked at the Listens Session based upon my twenty years of experience as a community consumer health librarian.

How do you identify potential community partners?
  • The short answer: look around. Consider an approach I call a community scan. Ask yourself, who is providing health services or supporting health within the community? A local hospital, for sure. And yes to the public health department. But what about the local senior or community center? Churches? Food bank? Veterans groups, Area Agency on Aging, Local chapters of health support or advocacy organizations, such as the National Alliance for Mental Health (NAMI), the Alzheimer’s Association, the Parkinson’s Foundation, PFLAG to name a few. What about local schools? Perhaps you can partner with local schools to teach school-age children health literacy skills. Does your community have Community Health Workers (CHWs)? If so, perhaps you can partner with them to support their ability to find reliable and culturally appropriate health information to share with their patients/clients.
  • If you are a hospital library staff member, your community scan will look a bit different. To the above scan, add what support groups are operational within the hospital? Are they interested in having you present to their group? Relevant topics may include how to evaluate online health information or resources for that specific diagnosis or condition. Could you partner with nurse or patient educators to help review patient-facing materials for health literacy? If you have health navigators, perhaps you can contribute to their onboarding experience and share resources and tools to support their patient education or Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) needs. Would a LibGuide for health navigators be a useful tool?
  • If you are in an academic health sciences library, again, in addition to the ideas above, your community scan may also consist of asking what departments are doing outreach with their students. Ask how can the library support this work? Can you partner with department staff to help ensure students have relevant patient information and educational resources for their outreach efforts? If your institution supports interdisciplinary education, does it address health literacy? If so, is the library embedded in this effort? Perhaps the library can host virtual presentations of guest faculty speaking on topics relevant to community health concerns.
What types of collaborative projects have you done with your community partners to advance health information access and use?   

Outreach projects of mine included the following:

  • Organized an annual general health fair with partners from the local hospital, public health, many social service agencies and community-based organizations with a health focus. Library staff offered participants the opportunity to enter a prize raffle by playing a game using MedlinePlus
  • Organized an annual heart health fair with community partners including the local hospital, public health department, community-based organizations offering heart healthy activities, clinical dieticians offering heart-healthy nutrition information & recipes, high school cross-country coach who created an easy, heart-healthy walk for the event.
  • Participated in the annual Diabetes Fair with other community partners sponsored by a local endocrinology practice and Diabetes Support Group. We provided diabetes recipes and health information from reliable diabetes resources.
  • Organized and offered semi-annual health lecture series featuring local healthcare providers.
  • Collaborated with the local public library to offer a recurring children’s healthy story time, featuring age-appropriate books and activities focused on a health message.
  • Served as a guest instructor in a high school health class that taught students how to evaluate web-based health information.
  • Participated as a member of the Regional Health Equity Coalition.
  • Contributed to the planning and conducting of the Community Health Needs Assessment.
  • Contributed to the Community Benefit Report of the library’s parent healthcare organization.
  • Taught digital health literacy skills to older adults at a community senior center.
  • Partnered with area public libraries, senior centers and graduate health professions students to present a program on navigating the healthcare system, tips for talking with your healthcare provider and web-based resources for reliable health information.
  • Taught an introduction to health literacy to hospital staff at new hire orientation.
What advice would you share when working with community partners?
  • Start small. It’s the advice I give most often. Make sure you truly have the time to devote to lead or participate in any partnership efforts. I’ve always found it more positive to scale up rather than cut back.
  • Approach your partnership as a mini-experiment or a pilot project. Like buying a new shirt: Try it on and see if it fits.
  • Make sure your project partners’ organizational mission aligns with your organization’s mission.
  • Have clearly define partnership project goals.
  • Have clearly defined partner roles.
  • Meet your assigned project tasks on time. If possible, exceed expectations.
  • Bring positive energy to the partnership. Believe in it. Most of all, enjoy it!
What kind of support can NNLM offer collaborative community partnerships?
  • Funding awards: Outreach, Technology and Professional Development awards
  • Education and training classes to develop skills
  • NNLM staff expertise to brainstorm partnership ideas and point to resources/educational materials in support of partnership projects

Thanks for letting me share what I know about partnerships. I’m sure I’ve forgotten a few things, even so, I hope this was helpful. I welcome your comments, questions and feedback.

Please note: Our next NNLM Region 5 Listens Session will bel held on Tuesday, November 16th at 3:00pm PST and our discussion topic will be: Lifelong Learning: NNLM Education Programs. Interested? Register here.

The post All I know About Partnerships first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

“A library is a hospital for the mind.” – Alvin Toffler

Fri, 2021-10-29 13:35

Look through your hospital of books and find words that can create inspirational poems. It’s the last week for submission.  In honor of National Medical Librarians Month and National Health Literacy Month NNLM is hosting a book spine poetry contest. All participants will be entered into a lottery to receive a free copy of each of the books selected from the NNLM Reading Club – a total of 15 books to add to your collection and share with your users!

The Rules

  1. Grab some books (at least 3)
  2. Stack them up!
  3. Arrange the titles to create a health related poem
  4. Take a photo and share it with us!

How to Enter

Submissions will be accepted throughout October. Send us your entry on Twitter by tagging @nnlmregion5 and #BookSpinePoetry or e-mail: nnlm@uw.edu  Individuals can submit up to three times.

10 winners will be selected following National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month.

Winners will receive the following topical collection of books:

  • Citizen Science
    Citizen Science; The Crowd and the Cosmos; Diary of a Citizen Scientist
  • Digital Health Literacy
    Deep Medicine; The Digital Doctor; The Future of Healthcare
  • Disability Health
    Every Note Played; Switched On; Tough as They Come
  • End of Life
    The Unwinding of the Miracle; Can’t we talk about something more Pleasant?; The Five Invitations
  • Environmental Health
    Amity and Prosperity; Plastic: A Toxic Love Story; What the Eyes Don’t See

Here’s a little book spine poem to get your creativity started!

 Health Librarianship; Putting Patients First; Answering Consumer Health Questions

The post “A library is a hospital for the mind.” – Alvin Toffler first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

Join us! November NNLM Region 5 Listens Session

Mon, 2021-10-25 15:47

Please join us for our monthly NNLM Region 5 Listens Session on Tuesday, November 16, 2021 from 3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Pacific Time | 2:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Alaska | 1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. HST | Noon – 1:00 p.m. SST (American Samoa) | November 17, 9:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. ChST (Guam). NNLM Region 5 serves organizations in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States.

A laptop computer announcing the November NNLM Region 5 Listens Session

The purpose of the NNLM Region 5 Listens Session series is to:

  • build relationships among NNLM Region 5 Network members;
  • learn about health information access, education, or technology needs; and
  • foster a fruitful exchange of perspectives on regional issues impacting the equal access to biomedical and health information resources and data.

After hearing from participants, our discussion topic for this session will be: Lifelong Learning: NNLM Educational Programs! NNLM staff will facilitate a discussion by asking the following:

  • How do you like to learn? On-demand? Live webinar? Short tutorials?…
  • What health information topics are important to serve your communities?
  • What professional development training is priority?
  • Additional comments related to training.

Registration is required to join the NNLM Region 5 Listens Session. You may submit questions  at the time of registration. NNLM Region 5 staff will do their best to address all submitted questions during the sixty-minute listening session.

Interested? Registration is free! And with this month’s session, we are using the new NNLM website to register. You’ll need to create a free user account. If you have any issues with registration, please contact NNLM Region 5’s membership coordinator, Emily Hamstra (Email: ehamstra@uw.edu)  Register here!

Please note that registration closes Monday, November 15, 2021 at 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time.

The post Join us! November NNLM Region 5 Listens Session first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

DataFlash: What is Health Data Literacy and “Data Literacy for the Busy Librarian”

Mon, 2021-10-25 03:00

A face with numbers dropping down in front of the eyesBig Data is a buzzword in many industries these days including healthcare.  What is data literacy and how does it apply and impact healthcare?  According to MIT and Dalhousie University, data literacy is the ability to collect, manage, evaluate, and apply data in a critical manner.  Though, most individuals didn’t go to school to be data scientists, statisticians, computer scientists etc.  In fact, most people do not consider themselves to be data literate.

In the healthcare field where we are bombarded with all kinds of data, – laboratory and test results, vitals, costs, patient EHRs, and much more – it is absolutely important for the healthcare industry to maximize its usage of this critical data for the betterment of the healthcare field as a whole.  How do we solve data illiteracy? The key is to understand that organizations and individuals need to actively buy in and embrace the data revolution, especially leadership which can help set the standard for the culture of the organization to make good use of data. At the individual level, people need to be honest with oneself and address one’s own weaknesses and fill in the knowledge gaps they have for data literacy – i.e., the ability to read, work with, analyze, and argue with data.  Once, individuals can understand their data literacy weaknesses, then, they can begin to understand how they can improve their respective data skillsets.

In February of 2022, the NNLM Region 5 will be offering a course on data literacy called “Data Literacy for the Busy Librarian”.  This 2-week Moodle course is designed for the beginner and the busier librarian in mind who has an interest in improving their data literacy skillset.  Registration for “Data Literacy for the Busy Librarian” is open now.

The post DataFlash: What is Health Data Literacy and “Data Literacy for the Busy Librarian” first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

“A room without books is like a body without a soul.” – Cicero

Fri, 2021-10-22 04:30

Look for the soul within your books by sharing a poem with words on their spines. In honor of National Medical Librarians Month and National Health Literacy Month NNLM is hosting a book spine poetry contest. All participants will be entered into a lottery to receive a free copy of each of the books selected from the NNLM Reading Club – a total of 15 books to add to your collection and share with your users!

The Rules

  1. Grab some books (at least 3)
  2. Stack them up!
  3. Arrange the titles to create a health related poem
  4. Take a photo and share it with us!

How to Enter

Submissions will be accepted throughout October. Send us your entry on Twitter by tagging @nnlmregion5 and #BookSpinePoetry or e-mail: nnlm@uw.edu                                          Individuals can submit up to three times.

10 winners will be selected following National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month.

Winners will receive a collection of 15 books on Citizen Science, Digital Health Literacy, Disability Health, End of Life and Environmental Health.

Here’s a little book spine poem to spark your creativity:

This book spine poem reads, "A Homemade Life, On Trails, The Pull of the Stars, Written in Stone."

Let’s Go Region 5!

The post “A room without books is like a body without a soul.” – Cicero first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

Back By Popular Demand: Collection Equity Award

Thu, 2021-10-21 04:45
Collection Equity Award Background/Purpose

The National Network of Libraries of Medicine Region 5 under cooperative agreement with the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), announces the availability of funding through its Collection Equity Awards to fund collection development that amplifies diverse voices writing on health/medical topics or that include a health or medical issue as an integral narrative theme. Such collection development efforts are important to ensure equitable access to health information and promote health literacy and support programmatic outreach in under-resourced communities.

The Awards are designed to help build collections that are reflective of voices of the communities served which may be revealed through different genres such as graphic medicine, fiction, nonfiction, memoirs, Young Adult, manuscripts (published and unpublished), oral histories and film. Expanding diverse voices in libraries (all types), public health agencies, academic programs, or community organizations ensures collection equity and supports health literacy by illuminating health issues either common, or conversely, unique to underserved populations in the region.

Specifically, the Collection Equity Award seeks to address one or more of the following aims from the NNLM Region 5 cooperative agreement and supports NLM’s mission to provide U.S. researchers, health professionals, public health workforce, educators, and the public with equal access to biomedical and health information resources and data.

  • Advance health equity through national and regional partnerships and initiatives to ensure a variety of members and the public will have equal access to biomedical, health, and public health information and data.
  • Administer funding awards to support a highly trained workforce for biomedical and health information resources and data, improve health literacy, and increase health equity through information.
Eligibility

Applicants must be from institutions that are members of NNLM Region 5. Membership is free and open to institutions interested in improving equitable access to health information. To verify your membership, find out your NNLM ID or to apply for membership, contact Outreach and Access Coordinator Emily Hamstra via email: ehamstra@uw.edu.

Funds from this award must be used for purchase of materials and resources from any genre that amplify diverse voices writing on health/medical topics or that include a health or medical issue as an integral narrative theme.

Funding

Funding Period: December 17, 2021 – April 30, 2022

Amount:  $1,500

Number of Awards Available: Minimum of 6

Application

Step 1: Send an email stating your intent to apply by 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time on November 12, 2021 to nnlm@uw.edu. Include the name of your library/organization and your intent to apply for the Collection Equity Award.

Step 2: Download this Application Form and submit the completed Application Form to nnlm@uw.edu by the Application Deadline: 5:00 p.m. Pacific Time, December 10, 2021

Note: 

  • Applications submitted by 5:00pm Pacific Time, December 10, 2021, will receive first consideration.
  • The NNLM Region 5 staff will acknowledge your application when received, and notification of awards will be given by December 17, 2021.
Budget Guidelines:
  • Award is $1,500. A lump sum payment will be issued upon submission of a completed invoice. The invoice template will be provided by Region 5 staff.
Evaluation of Applications

Applications will be reviewed by: NNLM Region 5 staff.

Reviewers will score applications based on the following categories and criteria.

  1. SIGNIFICANCE (60 points): The proposal:
    1. clearly defines the target populations it is meant to serve; and
    2. provides evidence of need.
  2. PROJECT PLAN (20 points): The project plan:
    1. demonstrates potential to increase access to biomedical and health information for defined target populations; and
    2. describes an effective publicity/promotion strategy.
  3. EVALUATION (20 points): The evaluation plan is clear and uses sound methodology.

REPORTING: The applicant agrees to the reporting requirement. This is an inclusion/exclusion criterion. Applicants lacking this element will be disqualified.

Additional Information

Reporting: 

A final report is required no later than May 27, 2022, which consists of a bibliography of the resources purchased. The citation format will be provided to awardees.

NIH Acknowledgement:

Any resource developed with project funds must include an acknowledgment of NIH grant support and a disclaimer stating the following:

“Developed resources reported in this [publications, press releases, internet sites] are supported by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health (NIH) under cooperative agreement number UG4LM013725. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health.”

Need additional information or help?

Michele Spatz, Outreach and Engagement Coordinator, NNLM Region 5, nnlm@uw.edu

Telephone: 206-543-8262

 

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Health Literacy Month: Digital Literacy

Wed, 2021-10-20 04:30

Today, for Health Literacy Month, we are focusing on digital literacy.

The World Health Organization defines digital health literacy as “the ability to seek, find, understand, and appraise health information from electronic sources and apply the knowledge gained to addressing or solving a health problem.”

The current global pandemic has heightened our reliance on digital communications – think telehealth, education, commerce, social connections – and has brought the digital divide into sharp focus. A 2019 survey found more than 21 million people in the United States still lack internet access. That includes 27 percent of rural Americans (nearly three in ten) as well as 2 percent of city dwellers and 44 percent of adults living in households with incomes below $30,000 (Winslow, 2019).

Libraries play a crucial role in communities by bridging that digital divide, from loaning hot spots and digital devices to offering both assistance and formal instruction in using digital technology to “seek, find, understand and appraise….knowledge.”

To help, NNLM has partnered with Wisconsin Health Literacy to offer digital health literacy skill-building resources. Interested in teaching or offering digital health literacy instruction? Try the Digital Health Literacy Curriculum. Want to link to short, instructional videos in both English and Spanish to support community members’ digital literacy skills development? Check out the Learn Internet Skills Online: Free Online Learning ModulesAnd lastly, a downloadable poster, Detecting Reliable Health Information Online.

Winslow, J. (2019, July 26). America’s digital divide. The Pew Charitable Trusts. https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/trust/archive/summer-2019/americas-digital-divide

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Categories: RML Blogs

See you at ARSL!

Mon, 2021-10-18 05:30

The Network of the National Library of Medicine (NNLM) will be at the annual ARSL (Association for Rural & Small Libraries) conference in Reno/Sparks Nevada.

Stop by the NNLM exhibit both, both in-person and virtually. It’s an opportunity to learn more about the freely available classes, funding, membership, and more. Learn more about health information resources and services to offer your communities to become better informed health consumers.

We have a session at the in-person conference. Attend the session, “I’m Not a Doctor”: Ethics and Best Practices in Health Reference, on Friday, October 22 at 11:00 a.m. to gain some tips to provide basic knowledge and improve your ability to conduct a health reference interview confidently and ethically at your library. Through discussion and role-playing activities attendees will come away equipped to address health-related questions through knowledge of authoritative health information resources, clarify the difference between providing health information versus medical advice, and tips for maintaining patron confidentiality and privacy.

Outreach and Access Coordinator, Emily Hamstra, will present Spark Talk, Finding and Using County Health Data to Inform Programming, Collections & Services, virtually. Resources for locating health data on your community will be presented, leaving you with fodder for generating ideas for programming, collections, and services to offer at your library.

Looking for ways to engage your community around health and digital literacy? Attend the virtual session, Health Literacy Possibilities @ Your Library, to learn how NNLM and All of Us are working together to support health and digital literacy initiatives at public libraries. Participants will learn about free resources from the National Library of Medicine as well as funding and programming opportunities for small and rural libraries.

We’d also like to offer those who are attending in-person the opportunity to meet with us during the conference. It’s a chance to learn about your health information work, ask questions, or just get acquainted.  Email us at nnlm@uw.edu

We’re excited to be part of the conference and are looking forward to meeting you virtually or in-person. Safe travels.

The post See you at ARSL! first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

“A healthy attitude is contagious, but don’t wait to catch it from others. Be a carrier.” – Tom Stoppard

Fri, 2021-10-15 05:30

Let’s be carriers and create messages with book spines that can inspire others. In honor of National Medical Librarians Month and National Health Literacy Month NNLM is hosting a book spine poetry contest. All participants will be entered into a lottery to receive a free copy of each of the books selected from the NNLM Reading Club – a total of 15 books to add to your collection and share with your users!

The Rules

  1. Grab some books (at least 3)
  2. Stack them up!
  3. Arrange the titles to create a health related poem
  4. Take a photo and share it with us!

How to Enter

Submissions will be accepted throughout October. Send us your entry on Twitter by tagging @nnlmregion5 and #BookSpinePoetry or e-mail: nnlm@uw.edu                                          Individuals can submit up to three times.

10 winners will be selected following National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month.

Winners will receive the following topical collection of books:

Citizen Science
Citizen Science; The Crowd and the Cosmos; Diary of a Citizen Scientist

Digital Health Literacy
Deep Medicine; The Digital Doctor; The Future of Healthcare

Disability Health
Every Note Played; Switched On; Tough as They Come

End of Life
The Unwinding of the Miracle; Can’t we talk about something more Pleasant?; The Five Invitations

Environmental Health
Amity and Prosperity; Plastic: A Toxic Love Story; What the Eyes Don’t See

Let’s Go Region 5!

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Health Literacy Month: Community Health Literacy

Thu, 2021-10-14 21:14

Today for Health Literacy Month, we are looking at community health literacy. What is meant by community health literacy?  According to a policy statement from the American Public Health Association, “An individual’s health literacy level is influenced by his or her language, ability to communicate clearly and listen carefully, age, socioeconomic status, cultural background, past experiences, cognitive abilities, and mental health. In addition, health literacy is affected by the assumptions and operations of health communicators and their respective health and social systems.” We can think of community health literacy as the unique ways health literacy operates in a given community or population group. To encourage community health literacy, it is important to be culturally competent, practice cultural humility, and be aware of language needs within different communities.

More About Community Health Literacy Children lined up in school. A young girl gets her temperature taken with a forehead thermometer by a person mostly out of frame.

Photo by RODNAE Productions from Pexels

National Library of Medicine Resources More Resources The post Health Literacy Month: Community Health Literacy first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
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Coming Soon! October NNLM Region 5 Listens Session

Tue, 2021-10-12 11:25

Please join us for our monthly NNLM Region 5 Listens Session on Tuesday, October 19, 2021 at 3:00 p.m. Pacific Time | 2:00 p.m. Alaska | Noon HST | 11:00 a.m. SST (American Samoa) | October 20, 8:00 a.m. ChST (Guam) for a one hour Listens Session. NNLM Region 5 serves organizations in Alaska, California, Hawaii, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, U.S. Territories and Freely Associated States.

Picture of a laptop computer

After responding to your questions, our discussion topic for this session will be: Strength Through Community Partnerships. NNLM staff will facilitate a discussion by asking the following:

  • How do you identify potential community partners?
  • What types of collaborative projects have you done with your community partners to advance health information access and use?
  • What advice would you share when working with community partners?
  • What kind of support can NNLM offer collaborative community partnerships?

Registration is required to join the NNLM Region 5 Listens Session. You may submit questions  at the time of registration. NNLM Region 5 staff will do their best to address all submitted questions during the sixty-minute listening session.

Interested? Registration is free. Register here!

The post Coming Soon! October NNLM Region 5 Listens Session first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
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DataFlash: Recruiting Students for MCBK Pilot Class

Fri, 2021-10-08 12:45

MCBK Cycle

Would you like to be part of pilot class to help improve delivery of computable applications to LIS professionals and healthcare providers? Library and Information professionals are invited to apply for training on Mobilizing Computable Biomedical Knowledge (MCBK). Training will be online using Zoom over two weeks in late December 2021 and early January 2022 (between traditional fall and spring semesters). As part of a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), the training will introduce how electronic journals can provide “dynamic knowledge” that readers can validate immediately. For example, for data, programming code or encodable prediction models in healthcare, readers can provide feedback and contribute to faster development of diagnosis treatments or tools to compute risk of coronavirus infection.

LEARNING GOALS from the pilot training in MCBK collections and technology are:

  • LIS professionals can help design more effective data archives and repositories to improve healthcare information accessibility for professionals, patients, and researchers.
  • Based on the pilot class and a community of practice (CoP) from universities, libraries, and medical schools, a sustainable open educational resource (OER) will be developed with online materials for future use.

As part of Learning Health Systems (LHS), MCBK strives to speed up access to information and computable tools, but the process is also applicable to other sciences and research. Whereas printed publications provide readable information, new technologies and platforms support electronic publication of computable knowledge. The availability of computable information can reduce the gap between research and practice from years to a few months. The National Library of Medicine (NLM) has begun supporting MCBK publications, such as the LHS Journal from the Michigan School of Medicine.

Space is limited to 15 students, but there will be a wait list. A stipend of up to $1500 will be paid to students for attending class and providing feedback. The 40-hour interactive class with speakers and discussions are 2-4 hours: December 15, 16, 20, 22, 23, 27, 28, 30 and January 3, 5, and 6. Mentors will support groups of students, too.  Please submit your letter of interest and resume to Dr. Deborah Swain, Project Director (dswain@nccu.edu) or Dr. Christopher Cunningham, Co-Director (ccunni23@nccu.edu) by November 15. Criteria for students includes both years of experience in LIS profession and motivation to learn for LIS students.

NOTE: The project directors will confirm your attendance prior to the workshop, and invited attendees will have 48 hours to reconfirm participation. Nonresponses will be removed from the list of potential students. If in the meantime you learn that you cannot attend, please alert Dr. Swain so that your space can be given to someone else. We will only contact waiting list participants if there is a place available.

The post DataFlash: Recruiting Students for MCBK Pilot Class first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

“Nothing is impossible. The word itself says I’m Possible.” – Audrey Hepburn

Fri, 2021-10-08 05:00

Don’t forget, in honor of National Medical Librarians Month and National Health Literacy Month NNLM is hosting a book spine poetry contest. All participants will be entered into a lottery to receive a free copy of each of the books selected from the NNLM Reading Club – a total of 15 books to add to your collection and share with your users!

The Rules

  1. Grab some books (at least 3)
  2. Stack them up!
  3. Arrange the titles to create a health related poem
  4. Take a photo and share it with us!

How to Enter

Submissions will be accepted throughout October. Send us your entry on Twitter by tagging @nnlmregion5 and #BookSpinePoetry or e-mail: nnlm@uw.edu    Individuals can submit up to three times.

10 winners will be selected following National Medical Librarians Month and Health Literacy Month.

Winners will receive the following topical collection of books:

Citizen Science
Citizen Science; The Crowd and the Cosmos; Diary of a Citizen Scientist

Digital Health Literacy
Deep Medicine; The Digital Doctor; The Future of Healthcare

Disability Health
Every Note Played; Switched On; Tough as They Come

End of Life
The Unwinding of the Miracle; Can’t we talk about something more Pleasant?; The Five Invitations

Environmental Health
Amity and Prosperity; Plastic: A Toxic Love Story; What the Eyes Don’t See

Let’s Go Region 5!

We can’t wait to read your submissions!

 Notes from a Public Typewriter, Bringing Yoga to Life, Till We Have faces

The post “Nothing is impossible. The word itself says I’m Possible.” – Audrey Hepburn first appeared on Region 5 Blog.
Categories: RML Blogs

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